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Discover, explore & remember the traditions of Newfoundland’s Cape Shore.

Explore the
Cape Shore

Listen to songs, music & stories. View photos of the people & places. Meet the singers & musicians from Ship Cove, Patrick’s Cove, St Bride’s, and Branch. This interactive map of the Cape Shore is a great way to start navigating your way around the outports of this short stretch of Newfoundland’s coastline.

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Placentia

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Ship's Cove

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Patrick's Cove

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St. Bride's

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Cape St. Mary's

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Branch

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Discover & Explore

The lovely Irish rose

Eta Nash

The lovely Irish rose / Eta Nash

The lovely Irish rose, song (A winding welard winds its way out to a lovely Irish home …) Composed by Fred Kearney of Carndonagh, Co Donegal, this song was available widely on commercial 78rpm records during the 1930s and ‘40s (McBride 1988:114–15). In more recent years, it was recorded by well-known Newfoundland singers Harry Hibbs (More Harry Hibbs, Arc Sound, 1968) and Eddie Coffey (Live at the Newfoundlander, Country Records, 1978).  Eta Nash learned “The lovely Irish rose” in order to sing it at a school concert.

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Frankie Nash plays the whistle in the Roche's house, Branch, Newfoundland, ca. 1976/77 / Aidan O'Hara

Frankie Nash plays the whistle in the Roche's house, Branch, Newfoundland, ca. 1976/77 / Aidan O'Hara

Frankie Nash plays the whistle for a party in Dermot and Rita Roche’s house in Branch, ca. October 1976/77. The onlookers in the background are (from left to right): Keith Roche (Dermot Roche's son) ; Mary Jean Roche (Dermot Roche's daughter) ; Rita Roche.

Banna's banks

Caroline Brennan

Banna's banks / Caroline Brennan

Banna's banks, song (As down by Banna's Banks I strayed one evening in May …) This 18th-century broadside ballad is more commonly known as “Molly Asthore.” Composition is credited to Wexford politician George Ogle (1739–1814). The protagonist of the song wanders by the shore (Co Kerry), thinking back on an estranged lover.  Caroline Brennan learned this song from her grandmother.

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Transcript of 'Siul a ghra' [Siúl a ghrá] as sung by Ellen Emma Power / Aidan O'Hara

Siúl a ghrá, song (Oh I'll go up in yonder hill …) A typed transcript based on Aidan O'Hara's field recording, with annotations and corrections by the collector.

John Hennessy step dances while Gerald Campbell plays the harmonica, August 1980 / The Radharc Trust Film Archive

John Hennessy step dances while Gerald Campbell plays the harmonica, August 1980 / The Radharc Trust Film Archive

John Hennessy step dances to music played by Gerald Campbell on the harmonica. This image appears in Radharc's 1981 documentary The Forgotten Irish.

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