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Discover, explore & remember the traditions of Newfoundland’s Cape Shore.

Explore the
Cape Shore

Listen to songs, music & stories. View photos of the people & places. Meet the singers & musicians from Ship Cove, Patrick’s Cove, St Bride’s, and Branch. This interactive map of the Cape Shore is a great way to start navigating your way around the outports of this short stretch of Newfoundland’s coastline.

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Placentia

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Ship's Cove

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Patrick's Cove

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St. Bride's

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Cape St. Mary's

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Branch

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Discover & Explore

The gambling man

Jack Mooney

The gambling man / Jack Mooney

The gambling man, song (I am a roaming gambler, I gamble down in town …) This American folk song is probably of British origin (Rosenbaum 2013:142). It tells the story of a man who likes to gamble and the woman who falls in love with him.  It was widely recorded by such popular commercial performers as the Everly Brothers, Bob Dylan, and Simon and Garfunkel, though perhaps the earliest recording was that by Kelly Harrel in 1925 under the title “Rovin’ Gambler” (Victor 20171-A). Jack Mooney’s version of “The gambling man,” though performed unaccompanied, closely resembles the version in the 1925 recording.

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My boy Willie

John Joe English

My boy Willie / John Joe English

My boy Willie, song (The sailing trade is a weary life …) This English broadside ballad is also known as “The sailor boy” or “Sweet William.” It is widely anthologised and recorded, with variant versions transforming Willie from a sailor to a lumberjack. It recounts the pain of a woman who is left behind when a loved one goes to sea and dies far from home.  This song was among John Joe English’s favourite songs.

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Transcript of 'Siul a ghra' [Siúl a ghrá] as sung by Ellen Emma Power / Aidan O'Hara

Siúl a ghrá, song (Oh I'll go up in yonder hill …) A typed transcript based on Aidan O'Hara's field recording, with annotations and corrections by the collector.

The hills of Glenswilly

Bernard Nash

The hills of Glenswilly / Bernard Nash

The hills of Glenswilly, song (Attention fellow countrymen come here my native news …) Written by Michael McGinley of Donegal, this song laments the necessity of leaving Donegal for a foreign land. Song collector Jim Carroll notes that McGinley may have composed the song while he travelled to New Zealand in 1879 aboard the “Invercardill.” The lyrics seem to indicate a political cause for emigration through the references to exile and raising a green flag over the hills of Glenswilly. 

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Vincent Roche with Sean, Conor and Brian O'Hara / Aidan O'Hara

Vincent Roche with Sean, Conor and Brian O'Hara / Aidan O'Hara

Aidan O'Hara's three young sons being pushed in a wheel barrow by Vincent Roche (son of Dermot Roche) through the yard at the Roche family house in Branch.

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