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Discover, explore & remember the traditions of Newfoundland’s Cape Shore.

Explore the
Cape Shore

Listen to songs, music & stories. View photos of the people & places. Meet the singers & musicians from Ship Cove, Patrick’s Cove, St Bride’s, and Branch. This interactive map of the Cape Shore is a great way to start navigating your way around the outports of this short stretch of Newfoundland’s coastline.

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Placentia

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Ship's Cove

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Patrick's Cove

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St. Bride's

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Cape St. Mary's

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Branch

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Discover & Explore

The bonny bunch of roses

Anthony Power

The bonny bunch of roses / Anthony Power

The bonny bunch of roses, song (I overheard a female talking …) The lyrics of this ballad take the form of a conversation between Napoleon Bonaparte’s widow and his son. She warns her son of the danger of challenging England, Ireland, and Scotland—the bonny bunch of roses—and the folly of attacking Russia.  Anthony’s version omits some of the lines that clarify the relationship of the characters, but the singer compensates by rearranging the order of the verses to create a coherent narrative. Most notably, the characters of Napoleon and his son are merged. Historically inaccurate, the song tells a tale of military expansion, of resistance met, and of the ultimate defeat of the invading forces by the opposing allies.

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Transcript of 'The emigrant from Newfoundland' as sung by Henry Campbell & Gerald Campbell / Aidan O'Hara

The emigrant from Newfoundland, song (Dear Newfoundland have I have leave you …) A typed transcript based on Aidan O'Hara's field recording, with annotations and corrections by the collector.

The fair Fanny Moore

Patsy Judge

The fair Fanny Moore / Patsy Judge

The fair Fanny Moore, song (Yonder stands a cottage all deserted and alone...) This murder ballad most likely has its origins in the Irish or English broadside presses, though it is much more commonly heard in North American contexts. Newfoundland song scholar Anna Kearney Guigné speculates that the song gained “new life in the New World through its dissemination by way of oral tradition in such contexts as the lumber camps alongside such media as print and recordings” (2016:122).  In other versions of this song, the wealthy suitor is named Randal and Fanny’s true love (a poor shepherd) is named Henry. In Patsy’s version of the song, the names are used interchangeably; it seems probable that this was simply a memory slip.

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Gerald Campbell playing the accordion / Aidan O'Hara

Gerald Campbell playing the accordion / Aidan O'Hara

Gerald Campbell playing the accordion in the Roche's house.

Emile Benoit, Bride and Patsy Judge, and Hugh Rowlings at the Judge's in St John's, Newfoundland / [unidentified photographer]

Emile Benoit, Bride and Patsy Judge, and Hugh Rowlings at the Judge's in St John's, Newfoundland / [unidentified photographer]

Bride (sitting) and Patsy Judge (right) with Song collector Hugh ‘Hoodie’ Rowlings (standing) and legendary Port au Port Peninsula fiddler Émile Benoît (left). The group were photographed in folklorist Kenneth Goldstein's house in St John's during the 1977 or '78 Folk Festival in Bannerman Park.

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