Search

 

Entries Related To: united-states-of-america

Cock-a-doodle-doo

Frankie Nash

Cock-a-doodle-doo / Frankie Nash

Cock-a-doodle-doo, song (One morning after breakfast taking a bit of the walk …) This comic song about a rooster is full of sexual innuendo. It tells the story of a man who buys a cock while out for a walk, and the variety of encounters that ensue.

PDF | 

Downloads

Metadata (Dublin Core)

Donald Monroe

Albert Roche

Donald Monroe / Albert Roche

Donald Monroe, song (Come all ye good men that's inclined for to roam, to seek for employment …) A variant of the 18th-century Scottish broadside, “Donald Munro,” this murder ballad tells the tale of a man who immigrates to America, leaving his sons behind as he cannot afford their fares. They follow in search of their father seven years later. They are attacked by highwaymen and killed. As they lay dying, their murderer realises that he has killed his two sons.  This song was widely sung in Newfoundland and several versions collected there, with the result that it exists with a number of different melodies and configurations of lyrics. Kenneth Peacock published three different versions in his Songs of the Newfoundland Outports 3 (1965:812–16). MacEdward Leach also recorded several versions.

PDF | 

Downloads

Metadata (Dublin Core)

Paddy in New York

John Joe English

Paddy in New York / John Joe English

Paddy in New York, song (Of an elderly man I'm going to tell you …) This comic song tells the story of an Irishman who goes to live in New York. Outraged when a barman overcharges for whiskey, he starts a fight, kills the barman, and is supported by other Irishmen in New York.

PDF | 

Downloads

Metadata (Dublin Core)

Pinto

 Denis Nash

Pinto / Denis Nash

Pinto, song (As I was riding one evening 'neath the starlite western sky…) This song is better known as “There’s a picture on Pinto’s Bridle,” recorded by Hank Snow in 1939.

PDF | 

Downloads

Metadata (Dublin Core)

The gambling man

Jack Mooney

The gambling man / Jack Mooney

The gambling man, song (I am a roaming gambler, I gamble down in town …) This American folk song is probably of British origin (Rosenbaum 2013:142). It tells the story of a man who likes to gamble and the woman who falls in love with him.  It was widely recorded by such popular commercial performers as the Everly Brothers, Bob Dylan, and Simon and Garfunkel, though perhaps the earliest recording was that by Kelly Harrel in 1925 under the title “Rovin’ Gambler” (Victor 20171-A). Jack Mooney’s version of “The gambling man,” though performed unaccompanied, closely resembles the version in the 1925 recording.

PDF | 

Downloads

Metadata (Dublin Core)

The schooner Mary Ann

Mike McGrath

The schooner Mary Ann / Mike McGrath

The schooner Mary Ann, song (Oh ye landsmen that live on the land, it's a little do you know …) Strong shipping links connected Newfoundland and New York during the 19th and early 20th centuries. This song tells the story of a smallpox outbreak on a ship travelling this route. In Songs of the Newfoundland Outports 3, Kenneth Peacock publishes the title of this song as “Bound down to Newfoundland” and observes that, though the subject matter might point to its being quite an old song, the reference to the Statue of Liberty dates its composition to after 1886 (1965:905–6).

PDF | 

Downloads

Metadata (Dublin Core)

Transcript of '[Cock-a-doodle-doo]' as sung by Frankie Nash / Aidan O'Hara

Cock-a-doodle-doo, song (One morning after breakfast taking a bit of the walk …) A typed transcript based on Aidan O'Hara's field recording, with annotations and corrections by the collector.

Transcript of '[Pinto]' as sung by Denis Nash / Aidan O'Hara

Pinto, song (As I was riding one bright evening neath the starlight western sky…) A typed transcript based on Aidan O'Hara's field recording, with annotations and corrections by the collector.

Transcript of '[The gambling man]' as sung by Jack Mooney / Aidan O'Hara

The gambling man, song (I am a roaming gambler, I gamble down in town …) A typed transcript based on Aidan O'Hara's field recording, with annotations and corrections by the collector.

Transcript of 'Donald Munroe' [Donald Monroe] as sung by Albert Roche / Aidan O'Hara

Donald Monroe, song (Come all ye good men that's inclined for to roam …) A typed transcript based on Aidan O'Hara's field recording, with annotations and corrections by the collector.