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Entries Related To: social-life-drinking

Bungle Rye

 Anthony Power

Bungle Rye / Anthony Power

Bungle Rye, song (As I went a-walking a fair London Street …) This early 19th-century broadside ballad is a warning about the dangers of female wiles. The protagonist is tricked into paying 20 shillings for a basket that he thinks contains a bottle of liquor. Instead it contains a baby, whom he christens John Bungle Rye.  In many versions of this song, the phrase “Bung yer eye” appears instead of “Bungle Rye.” Indeed, Kenneth Peacock includes this song in Songs of the Newfoundland Outports 3, under the title “Young Bung-’er’eye,” noting that “bung-yer-eye” is an old sailing term for strong rum or hard liquor (1965:895–6).

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Cock-a-doodle-doo

Frankie Nash

Cock-a-doodle-doo / Frankie Nash

Cock-a-doodle-doo, song (One morning after breakfast taking a bit of the walk …) This comic song about a rooster is full of sexual innuendo. It tells the story of a man who buys a cock while out for a walk, and the variety of encounters that ensue.

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Paddy in New York

John Joe English

Paddy in New York / John Joe English

Paddy in New York, song (Of an elderly man I'm going to tell you …) This comic song tells the story of an Irishman who goes to live in New York. Outraged when a barman overcharges for whiskey, he starts a fight, kills the barman, and is supported by other Irishmen in New York.

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The gambling man

Jack Mooney

The gambling man / Jack Mooney

The gambling man, song (I am a roaming gambler, I gamble down in town …) This American folk song is probably of British origin (Rosenbaum 2013:142). It tells the story of a man who likes to gamble and the woman who falls in love with him.  It was widely recorded by such popular commercial performers as the Everly Brothers, Bob Dylan, and Simon and Garfunkel, though perhaps the earliest recording was that by Kelly Harrel in 1925 under the title “Rovin’ Gambler” (Victor 20171-A). Jack Mooney’s version of “The gambling man,” though performed unaccompanied, closely resembles the version in the 1925 recording.

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The Irish colleen

Jack Mooney

The Irish colleen / Jack Mooney

The Irish colleen, song (I went to a party consisting of four …) This song describes a party at which four toasts are proposed: a Welsh girl toasts a leek, a Scottish girl toasts a thistle, an English girl toasts a rose, and an Irish girl toasts a shamrock and Ireland.

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Transcript of '[Cock-a-doodle-doo]' as sung by Frankie Nash / Aidan O'Hara

Cock-a-doodle-doo, song (One morning after breakfast taking a bit of the walk …) A typed transcript based on Aidan O'Hara's field recording, with annotations and corrections by the collector.

Transcript of '[The gambling man]' as sung by Jack Mooney / Aidan O'Hara

The gambling man, song (I am a roaming gambler, I gamble down in town …) A typed transcript based on Aidan O'Hara's field recording, with annotations and corrections by the collector.

Transcript of 'John bungle rye' as sung by Anthony Power / Aidan O'Hara

John bungle rye, song (As I went awalking out fair London Street …) A typed transcript based on Aidan O'Hara's field recording, with annotations and corrections by the collector.