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Entries Related To: scotland

Alana MacInnes and Ewan Henderson / Tony Kearns

Alana MacInnes and Ewan Henderson / Tony Kearns

Anders Trajberg and others / Orla Henihan

Anders Trajberg and others / Orla Henihan

Braigh Uige, song / Anne Martin

Cameron’s selection of violin music, 1859

God save the Queen -- The Marseillois hymn -- Yankee doodle -- My lodging is on the cold ground -- Mrs Garden of Troup -- I'll gang nae mair to yon town -- Fye let us a' to the bridal -- O gin ye were dead, gudeman -- Mrs M'Intyre -- Clyde Side lasses -- Go to Berwick, Johnny -- Life let us cherish -- Tullochgorum -- If I had a bonnie lassie -- The lady of the lake -- Kind Robin lo'es me -- Lord Murray -- Green grow the rashes -- Katy Mooney -- Gloomy winter's now awa' -- I lost my love, and I dinna ken how -- The drummer -- Bung your eye -- Nathaniel Gow's lament for his brither -- Logan water -- Jenny Nettles -- My heart is sair for somebody -- Caller herrin' -- Brechin Castle -- Lady Montgomery -- Bay of Biscay -- Mr Francis Sitwell -- Miss Dumbreck -- The college hornpipe -- The rose tree -- Cameron's got his wife again -- Jenny dang the weaver -- The deuks dang o'er my daddie -- My love is like a red red rose -- Craigellachie Bridge -- Rachel Rae -- The dead march = Soldier's dream -- The Hills of Glenorchy -- I hae a house o' my ain -- Jacky tar -- My boy Tammy -- Charlie is my darling -- Struan Robertson's rant -- Mrs Brown of Linkwood -- Within a mile of Edinburgh -- Lady Nelly Wemyss -- The high road to Linton -- Meg Merrilees -- Of a' the airts the win' can blaw -- Highland whisky -- Speed the plough -- Miss Graham of Inchbraikie -- Eveleen's bower -- Lady Carmichael -- Caberfeigh -- Willie was a wanton wag -- Locherroch side -- The Ayrshire lasses -- Fight about the fireside -- Jock o' Hazledean -- Dainty Davie -- Cameronian rant -- Petronella -- Earl Moira -- Maid of Isla -- [Untitled] -- Whistle o'er the lave o't -- The Duke of Gordon's birth day -- The flowers of Edinburgh -- St Patrick's day in the morning -- See the conquering hero comes -- O dear what can the matter be -- Monymusk -- Push about the jorum -- Highland Mary -- Miss Lyle's strathspey -- Miss Lyle's reel -- Bonnie Dundee = Mary of Castlecary -- Gilderoy -- Kiss'd yestreen -- I wish you would marry me now -- The flowers of the forest -- Gin a body meet a body -- Jenny Lind polka -- The Gustavus galop -- Hurrah, for the bonnets of blue -- Jenkin's hornpipe -- The legacy -- The opera polka -- Jenny Jones -- The British Grenadier's march -- Marquis of Huntly's highland fling -- Pease strae -- The boatie rows -- Off she goes -- This is no my ain lassie -- Marquis of Huntly's farewell -- Timour the tartar -- Because he was a bonnie lad -- My ain kind dearie -- The miller o' drone -- The mason's apron -- Ye banks and braes -- Bannocks o' barley meal -- The young may moon -- Untitled -- Mrs Hamilton of Pitcaithland -- North of the Grampians -- Miss Forbes -- Auld Robin Gray -- Willie brew'd a peck o' maut -- Mrs M'Dowal Frant of Arndilly -- Inverness lasses -- Saw ye Johnnie comin' -- The Lothian lassie -- Morar shiem = Lovat's welcome -- Lady Harriet Hope -- The original polka -- Bonnie Jean -- Lord Seaforth -- Loch Earn -- Aurora waltz -- The last rose of summer -- The Belleisle march -- The white cockade -- The schottische, or, German polka -- The angel's whisper -- Katty darling -- Blue bonnets over the border -- Circassian circle -- Kinloch of Kinloch -- O whistle and i'll come to you my lad -- Farewell to whisky -- Robertson's hornpipe -- Hearts of oak -- A man's a man for a' that -- West's hornpipe -- The fairy dance -- The mill, mill o -- Rule Britannia -- Lady Mary Ramsay -- Lord Dalhousie -- The ewie wi' the crooked horn -- My Tocher's the jewel -- The Marquis of Huntly -- Captain Keeler's reel -- John Anderson, my Jo -- John of Badenyon -- Braes o' Tullymet -- Colonel M'Bain -- Weel may the keel row -- Will ye go to Sherriff Muir? -- Niel Gow -- The deil amang the tailors -- The triumph -- The Athol highlanders march -- The Carding o't -- Rattling roaring Willie -- Mrs M'Leod of Rasay -- Haud awa' frae me, Donald -- The garb of old Gaul -- The new rigged ship -- The highlandman kiss'd his mother -- The boys of Kilkenny -- The M'Gregor's gathering -- The Tweedale Club -- Double kisses -- The Caledonian march -- A favourite hornpipe -- The cachucha dance -- Home, sweet home -- Ap Shenkin -- Fisher's hornpipe -- The Brunswick waltz -- The dusty miller -- Lilla's a lady -- The lancers quadrille -- Bab at the bowster = The bumpkin -- Pop goes the weazel -- Why left I my hame? -- The blue bells of Scotland -- Miss Mary Lunsden's favourite -- The sprig of shillelah -- Sich a gettin' up stairs -- Short life to stepmothers -- Duncan Davidson -- The Liverpool hornpipe -- Paddy O'Carrol -- Logie o' Buchan -- Pretty Peggy -- Blewitt's jig = Barney Brallagan -- The back of the change-house -- Nanny wilt thou gang wi' me -- Lady Doune -- Miss Davidson's reel -- Lochaber no more -- The bonniest lass in a' the warld -- The jolly beggar -- Tink a tink -- Oh, carry me back to ole virginny -- The falls of foyers -- Rothiemurchie's rant -- The square and compass -- Robin Adair -- Paddy Carey -- Lady Loudon's strathspey -- The Fife hunt -- Bonnie Jeanie Gray -- Miss Forbes's farewell to Banff -- The Campbells are coming -- Astley's hornpipe -- There's nae luck about the house -- Lady Charlotte Campbell -- Lord McDonald -- Persian dance -- Gin a body meet a body -- March to the battle field -- The Laird o' Cockpen -- Up an' waur them a', Willie

Cameron’s Selection of Violin Music, 1859

Musical influences have moved forward and back across the narrow divide of the Irish Sea in line with changing patterns of settlement and migration. Irish harpers seem to have brought much music to Scotland in medieval times, and subsequently Scottish pipers are said to have gone to Ireland to complete their training. But undoubtedly in the later 18th century musical influence was travelling westwards from Scotland into Ireland, brought by performers on the violin, the newly dominant instrument of the period, and in printed music collections. Scottish reels and strathspeys especially were introduced into Ireland at this time. The imported tunes quickly became naturalised here, and sparked Irish compositions in these new genres. The little-known Scottish violin collection Cameron’s Selection of Violin Music, presented here from the collections of the Irish Traditional Music Archive, was published in Glasgow in 1859 by the general publisher George Cameron. It is typical of its kind: cheap and intended for a mass market, with a predominance of popular 18th-century Scottish dance tunes and airs, mixed in with Irish and English melodies. It doubtless circulated in Ireland, and like other similar ephemeral Scottish publications doubtless had an influence on the oral Irish tradition at a time when there were few such Irish publications. ITMA’s recent William Mullaly traditional concertina publication exhibits traces of Scottish printed music, and ongoing ITMA work on a second volume from the piping manuscripts of James Goodman has uncovered versions of tunes close to those of Cameron. We know from the index that the final two pages are missing from the ITMA copy of Cameron. Do you have a perfect copy of this collection, or do you have similar music collections? The Archive would welcome their donation or the opportunity to copy them. With thanks to Lisa Shields for information, and to the Breathnach Family who donated the volume reproduced here to ITMA in 1987 as part of Cnuasach an Bhreathnaigh (the Breandán Breathnach Collection). ITMA would welcome the donation of other materials of this kind which are not yet in its collections (check our catalogues here), or of their loan for copying. NC & MG, 1 December 2011  

Colonna's lone shore

Denis McGrath

Colonna's lone shore / Denis McGrath

Colonna's lone shore, song (I will sing the word of young wandering Nellie ...) Written by Andrew Sharpe during the early 19th century, this song describes the death of a soldier at the Battle of Corunna on 16 January 1809. The focus, however, is on the reaction of the soldier’s sweetheart when word of his death arrives back in Scotland. Song collector Robert Ford writes in Vagabond Songs and Ballads of Scotland:  “Andrew Sharpe had observed that, since Herdman’s departure, Ellen Rankine was greatly changed. Her passionate blue eyes had begun to fade, and her luxuriant brown hair, the pride of better days, to get tangled and dry; but when the news of his death came she sank into helpless idiocy, and despite the careful watchings of her distressed parents, she stole from them in a luckless moment, and, taking the back of the hill, went crooning and singing for a whole week away through the Howe of Strathmore” (1904:84).

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Féis Ghlaschu,1963

Gillie Callum or sword dance / unidentified artist

Gillie Callum or sword dance / unidentified artist

Jarlath Henderson and Scottish piper / Paul Eliasberg

Jarlath Henderson and Scottish piper / Paul Eliasberg

Lochaber no more / unidentified artist

Lochaber no more / unidentified artist

Mick O’Brien, uilleann pipes, & others, 2007 / Paul Eliasberg

Mick O’Brien, uilleann pipes, & others, 2007 / Paul Eliasberg

Moffat’s Minstrelsy of Ireland, 1890s

Having studied music in Berlin, he had professional connections with German publishing houses, and also edited for the London publishers Augener & Co. and Bayley & Ferguson, between about 1894 and 1907, some thousand national songs in a Minstrelsy of… series . These volumes typically comprised 200 songs, and represented respectively Scotland, Ireland, England, Wales, and the Scottish Highlands. Most appeared in different undated editions in the 1890s and early 1900s, and were reprinted in the 1970s in the United States. Moffat’s Minstrelsy of Ireland: 206 Irish Songs Adapted to Their Traditional Airs, reproduced below in its fourth and final edition, first appeared in 1898 (undated but with a preface of 1897) with three further editions produced by the early 1900s. The original edition comprised 200 songs, arranged by Moffat for voice and piano, but six more were added in the third edition. The particular value of Moffat’s Minstrelsy of Ireland now resides in the pioneering historical notes that accompany each song, and which involved him in original library research in Ireland. They show a wide knowledge of early Irish printed collections of music, and also make connections with early British collections. His preface acknowledges the assistance he received from Irish scholars such as P.W. Joyce, and from British scholars such as Frank Kidson of Leeds and John Glen of Edinburgh. Alfred Moffat also edited in the early 1900s various other undated Irish collections, such as his Gems of Irish Melody and Irish National Songs, and items of Irish sheet music. For permission to reproduce this digitised edition and for other help, the Irish Traditional Music Archive is indebted to Alfred Moffat’s great-granddaughter Tricia Rawlingson Plant.  ITMA would welcome the donation of other materials of this kind which are not yet in its collections (check our catalogues here), or of their loan for copying. NC & MG, 1 February 2012