Search

 

Entries Related To: newfoundland

A first visit to the Cape Shore / Aidan O'Hara

Aidan O’Hara describes his first visit to the Cape Shore, meeting John Keefe in Placentia, and the way that Ireland was remembered by the people whom he encountered. This conversation is excerpted from a longer interview that focused on Aidan’s years in Newfoundland, work as a broadcaster in Newfoundland, and relationship with the people of the Cape Shore.

A house party in Branch, The Forgotten Irish / Aidan O'Hara

The opening sequence from The Forgotten Irish documentary depicting a “time” in the Roche household. This clip features set dancing and accordion playing. The Forgotten Irish television documentary first broadcast on 17 March 1981 in celebration of the Irish living overseas on St Patrick’s Day. The Radharc documentary film series includes over 400 films dealing with issues of human rights, injustice, faith, religion, persecution, struggles against oppressive regimes, famine, and Christian heritage.  With thanks to RTÉ Archives for granting permission to exhibit this clip from The Forgotten Irish. To view the entire documentary, visit https://www.rte.ie/archives/ex...

A stormy day on the Cape Shore, ca. 1976 / Aidan O'Hara

A stormy day on the Cape Shore, ca. 1976 / Aidan O'Hara

Cape St Mary's is visible in the distance.

A view of the crowd at the 1978 Newfoundland Folk Festival / Len Penton, photographer

A view of the crowd at the 1978 Newfoundland Folk Festival / Len Penton, photographer

A view of the stage and crowd at the Second Annual Newfoundland Folk Festival in Bannerman Park, St John's, Newfoundland.

A visit with Caroline Brennan / Aidan O'Hara

A visit with Caroline Brennan / Aidan O'Hara

Caroline Brennan and her family standing outside her house in Ship Cove with visitors. Left to right: Joyce O'Hara, Caroline Brennan, Lucy Nash (née Connors), Virginia Ryan (née Preston). 

Aidan and Joyce O'Hara performing at the Newfoundland Folk Festival, 1978 / Len Penton, photographer

Aidan and Joyce O'Hara performing at the Newfoundland Folk Festival, 1978 / Len Penton, photographer

Aidan O'Hara plays the guitar while Joyce O'Hara sings. Their three sons play in front of the stage (Conor, Brian, and Sean). Several singers and musicians sit at the back of the stage (left to right): John Joe English, Anita Best, Caroline Brennan, John ‘Skinny’ White, Joe Byrne, Pius Power Snr, Pius Power Jnr.

Albert Roche sings while Gerald Campbell looks on, ca. 1975 / Aidan O'Hara

Albert Roche sings while Gerald Campbell looks on, ca. 1975 / Aidan O'Hara

Albert Roche sings while Gerald Campbell looks on, ca. 1975.

Anthony Power and friends at the 1978 Newfoundland Folk Festival / Aidan O'Hara

Anthony Power and friends at the 1978 Newfoundland Folk Festival / Aidan O'Hara

Relaxing at the 1978 NL Folk Festival, from left to right: Anthony Power, Virginia Ryan (née Preston), Lucy Nash (née Connors), and Mary Power. Photographer Len Penton (right) stands chatting with Ron Felix (left) and an unknown woman in the background.

Banna's banks

Caroline Brennan

Banna's banks / Caroline Brennan

Banna's banks, song (As down by Banna's Banks I strayed one evening in May …) This 18th-century broadside ballad is more commonly known as “Molly Asthore.” Composition is credited to Wexford politician George Ogle (1739–1814). The protagonist of the song wanders by the shore (Co Kerry), thinking back on an estranged lover.  Caroline Brennan learned this song from her grandmother.

PDF | 

Downloads

Metadata (Dublin Core)

Bells of Shandon

Ellen Emma Power

Bells of Shandon / Ellen Emma Power

Bells of Shandon, song (With deep affection and recollection, I often think on those Shandon Bells …) This song was composed by the Rev Francis Mahoney (Father Prout, 1804–1866). In this nostalgic song, the protagonist remembers the sound of the church bells being rung in St Anne’s Church, Shandon, Co Cork.

PDF | 

Downloads

Metadata (Dublin Core)

Brennan on the moor

Patsy Judge

Brennan on the moor / Patsy Judge

Brennan on the moor, song (It's of a fearless highwayman the truth to you I'll tell …) Probably of Irish origin, this broadside ballad tells the story of folk hero and highwayman Willie Brennan, who was tried and hanged in Clonmel in 1804. Some versions of this song place Brennan in the mountains near Limerick; other versions depict Brennan on the highways of North Cork and South Tipperary.  Patsy Judge’s version references the Comeragh Mountains, perhaps a nod to the ancestry of the people of the Cape Shore, whose origins were mainly in Ireland’s southeast.

PDF | 

Downloads

Metadata (Dublin Core)

Bungle Rye

 Anthony Power

Bungle Rye / Anthony Power

Bungle Rye, song (As I went a-walking a fair London Street …) This early 19th-century broadside ballad is a warning about the dangers of female wiles. The protagonist is tricked into paying 20 shillings for a basket that he thinks contains a bottle of liquor. Instead it contains a baby, whom he christens John Bungle Rye.  In many versions of this song, the phrase “Bung yer eye” appears instead of “Bungle Rye.” Indeed, Kenneth Peacock includes this song in Songs of the Newfoundland Outports 3, under the title “Young Bung-’er’eye,” noting that “bung-yer-eye” is an old sailing term for strong rum or hard liquor (1965:895–6).

PDF | 

Downloads

Metadata (Dublin Core)