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Entries Related To: gerald-campbell

A house party in Branch, The Forgotten Irish / Aidan O'Hara

The opening sequence from The Forgotten Irish documentary depicting a “time” in the Roche household. This clip features set dancing and accordion playing. The Forgotten Irish television documentary first broadcast on 17 March 1981 in celebration of the Irish living overseas on St Patrick’s Day. The Radharc documentary film series includes over 400 films dealing with issues of human rights, injustice, faith, religion, persecution, struggles against oppressive regimes, famine, and Christian heritage.  With thanks to RTÉ Archives for granting permission to exhibit this clip from The Forgotten Irish. To view the entire documentary, visit https://www.rte.ie/archives/ex...

Albert Roche sings while Gerald Campbell looks on, ca. 1975 / Aidan O'Hara

Albert Roche sings while Gerald Campbell looks on, ca. 1975 / Aidan O'Hara

Albert Roche sings while Gerald Campbell looks on, ca. 1975.

Dear old Newfoundland

Gerald Campbell

Dear old Newfoundland / Gerald Campbell

Dear old Newfoundland, song (Twas just a year ago today I left my Emerald's Isle …) Originally recorded by John Barr (also known as Little John Cameron) in 1967 under the title “Tribute to Newfoundland,” this song is an account of the similarities between Ireland and Newfoundland. The melody is similar to that used by Ewan MacColl for his song, “Come my little son.”

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Gerald Campbell and Jack Mooney performing at the 1977 Folk Festival in St John's, Newfoundland / Aidan O'Hara

Gerald Campbell and Jack Mooney performing at the 1977 Folk Festival in St John's, Newfoundland / Aidan O'Hara

Jack Mooney (right) and Gerald Campbell (left) on stage at the 1977 Newfoundland Folk Festival in Bannerman Park, St. John’s.

Gerald Campbell playing the accordion / Aidan O'Hara

Gerald Campbell playing the accordion / Aidan O'Hara

Gerald Campbell playing the accordion in the Roche's house.

Gerald Campbell playing the accordion for dancers, August 1980 / The Radharc Trust Film Archive

Gerald Campbell playing the accordion for dancers, August 1980 / The Radharc Trust Film Archive

Gerald Campbell playing the accordion for a house party in the Roche house. This image appears in the opening scene of Radharc's 1981 documentary The Forgotten Irish.

John Hennessy step dances while Gerald Campbell plays the harmonica, August 1980 / The Radharc Trust Film Archive

John Hennessy step dances while Gerald Campbell plays the harmonica, August 1980 / The Radharc Trust Film Archive

John Hennessy step dances to music played by Gerald Campbell on the harmonica. This image appears in Radharc's 1981 documentary The Forgotten Irish.

Step dancing in Branch, The Forgotten Irish / Aidan O'Hara

Gerald Campbell plays singles on harmonica while John Hennessy step dances in Dermot Roche’s kitchen. This sequence featured in The Forgotten Irish documentary. The Forgotten Irish television documentary first broadcast on 17 March 1981 in celebration of the Irish living overseas on St Patrick’s Day. The Radharc documentary film series includes over 400 films dealing with issues of human rights, injustice, faith, religion, persecution, struggles against oppressive regimes, famine, and Christian heritage.  With thanks to RTÉ Archives for granting permission to exhibit this clip from The Forgotten Irish. To view the entire documentary, visit https://www.rte.ie/archives/ex...

The emigrant from Newfoundland

Gerald Campbell

The emigrant from Newfoundland / Gerald Campbell

The emigrant from Newfoundland, song (Dear Newfoundland, have I got to leave you …) This song may have been composed by JT Kinsella when he emigrated from Newfoundland to settle in Boston, Massachusetts. It laments the necessity of leaving Newfoundland to seek work on the mainland, in this case Boston. The song offers commentary on Confederation with Canada and includes reminiscences of favourite events and places in the St John’s area.  The song was published as early as 1904 in St John’s under the title “The Newfoundland exile” in James Murphy’s Old Colony Song Book. Details about the history of this song are available from the GEST song index. Variants have been published by Kenneth Peacock in the Songs of the Newfoundland Outports 2 (1965:360–61) and by MacEdward Leach.

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The girl who slighted me

Gerald Campbell

The girl who slighted me / Gerald Campbell

The girl who slighted me, song (And I'll go down to yonder valley …) This song tells of an unhappy courtship. After being slighted by his sweetheart, the (male) protagonist of the song curses the girl in question and leaves Ireland for America.  One of the more common variants of this song is known as “Courting is a pleasure,” and Kenneth Peacock published another version in Songs of the Newfoundland Outports 2 under the title “In courtship there lies pleasure” (1965:465–466).

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Thomas Trim

Gerald Campbell

Thomas Trim / Gerald Campbell

I'm Thomas Trim, song (I’m Thomas Trim a swell young man …) Gerald Campbell learned this song from his father, Henry Campbell. Henry Campbell sang “Thomas Trim” in a school concert around 1910. The song describes a young dandy going on promenade to show off his finery

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Transcript of '[Dear old Newfoundland]' as sung by Gerald Campbell / Aidan O'Hara

Dear old Newfoundland, song (Twas just a year ago today I left my Emerald's Isle …) A typed transcript based on Aidan O'Hara's field recording, with annotations and corrections by the collector.