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Conversation about music for dancing and types of dances

Patsy Judge & Bride Judge

Conversation about music for dancing and types of dances / Patsy Judge & Bride Judge

Patsy Judge performs several examples of “cheek” or “gob” music (i.e., dance music performed with the voice only), simultaneously explaining where these tunes were most likely to appear within the set dance.  The examples appear in the following order: “There was an old woman” (jig), “Tatter Jack Walsh” (jig), “All the way to Connickmore” (single), “Haste to the wedding” (jig), “The girl I left behind me” (single), “Girls in the salthouse” (single), “Mother wouldn’t beat him” (single), “Irishman’s shanty” (single), “Pop goes the weasel” (jig), “Green grow the rushes-o” (reel).

Emile Benoit, Bride and Patsy Judge, and Hugh Rowlings at the Judge's in St John's, Newfoundland / [unidentified photographer]

Emile Benoit, Bride and Patsy Judge, and Hugh Rowlings at the Judge's in St John's, Newfoundland / [unidentified photographer]

Bride (sitting) and Patsy Judge (right) with Song collector Hugh ‘Hoodie’ Rowlings (standing) and legendary Port au Port Peninsula fiddler Émile Benoît (left). The group were photographed in folklorist Kenneth Goldstein's house in St John's during the 1977 or '78 Folk Festival in Bannerman Park.

In Yorkshire city

Bride Judge

In Yorkshire city / Bride Judge

In Yorkshire city, song (Oh, in Yorkshire city there dwelled a maiden …) This murder ballad tells the tale of a woman who falls in love with her father’s servant. He poisons her when she declines his proposal, and then, stricken by remorse, he kills himself. The song exists in many variant versions of the lyrics; it is also known as “Oxford city,” “The cup of poison,” “The jealous lover,” or, simply, “Jealousy.”  The melody given here is used also for other songs performed by Cape Shore singers.

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The lady in the east

Bride Judge

The lady in the east / Bride Judge

The lady in the east, song (There was a lady in the east …) This broadside ballad tells a tale of murder and heartbreak. A young woman falls in love with her father’s clerk; she persists with the romance despite her father’s objections. Her father then shoots her and her lover commits suicide. In Songs of the Newfoundland Outports 3, Kenneth Peacock observes that this ballad seems to have survived mainly in Atlantic Canada (1965:726–8).

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