Search

 

Bernard Joseph (“Ben”) Nash (1898–1987)

Nlresize 1976 Cape Shore
A stormy day on the Cape Shore, ca. 1976 (photo courtesy of Aidan O’Hara; used with permission).

Bernard Nash was a fisherman and a logger. He was born in Branch on 17 August 1898 and lived most of his life there. Many of his songs he learned were from his sister, Caroline Nash Brennan. Some he learned some from friends he made while working in the lumberwoods in Deer Lake, Newfoundland. 

Bernard died on 16 January 1987 in his 89th year.


Listen

Quigley and Picco / Bernard Nash ; Tom Murphy

Get the details

Quigley and Picco / Bernard Nash ; Tom Murphy

Quigley and Picco, song (Ye sons of Erin please pay attention …) Originally published in the St John’s Evening Telegram on 24 December 1891 (vol. 13/291:19) and reproduced as “Quigley on Picco” in James Murphy’s Old Songs of Newfoundland (1912), this song was composed by Johnny Quigley—the “Bard of Erin” (for details about Quigley and the history of this song, visit the GEST Song Index). During the 19th century, sectarian tensions marked Newfoundland society and politics. Though tensions between Catholic and Protestant populations were dissipated through political negotiations, power sharing, and alliances between partisans, there were moments of violence during the 1870s and ‘80s.  When Aidan O’Hara recorded “Quigley and Picco” a century later, those present remarked that one had to be careful about singing such songs; there was a time when performing it would have been considered treasonous.

The hills of Glenswilly / Bernard Nash

Get the details

The hills of Glenswilly / Bernard Nash

The hills of Glenswilly, song (Attention fellow countrymen come here my native news …) Written by Michael McGinley of Donegal, this song laments the necessity of leaving Donegal for a foreign land. Song collector Jim Carroll notes that McGinley may have composed the song while he travelled to New Zealand in 1879 aboard the “Invercardill.” The lyrics seem to indicate a political cause for emigration through the references to exile and raising a green flag over the hills of Glenswilly. 


Biographical Information

Biographical note written by Rosella Coffey (granddaughter).