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Fain Waterloo

Caroline Brennan

Fain Waterloo / Caroline Brennan

Fain Waterloo, song (It happened to be on a fine dewy morning …) This song tells the story of a soldier reuniting with his sweetheart. He tests her fidelity by leading her to believe that he died at the Battle of Waterloo. When she proves herself true, he reveals that he is her sweetheart by showing her the broken token that they shared.  Versions of this song are quite common in eastern Canada, including Newfoundland. Kenneth Peacock published a version in Songs of the Newfoundland Outports 3 (1965:1014–1015), as did Greenleaf and Mansfield in The Ballads and Sea Songs of Newfoundland (1933:172–173), under the title “The plains of Waterloo.”

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Golden Bay

Anthony Power

Golden Bay / Anthony Power

Golden Bay, song (In nineteen hundred and twelve, my boys for Golden Bay set sail …) Composed by brothers Henry Nash (Sr) and Bernard Nash who fished together in Golden Bay, this song describes a whaling expedition that left Branch in 1912. The crew caught a whale, but it rotted before they could sell it for the thirty pounds in gold that they expected to receive.  Henry Nash (Sr) was the father-in-law of Anthony Power, who performs the song here. 

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Singers, songs & community / Aidan O'Hara

Aidan O’Hara describes some of the people from the Cape Shore who feature in his recordings, including Albert Roche, Frankie Nash, Anthony Power, and Caroline Brennan. He discusses the different types of songs that he heard on the Cape Shore and the sources of those songs, including radio and time spent overseas during the First World War.  This conversation is excerpted from a longer interview that focused on Aidan’s years in Newfoundland, work as a broadcaster in Newfoundland, and relationship to the Cape Shore.

Times, chats & becoming a collector / Aidan O'Hara

Aidan O’Hara describes a “time” and other occasions for recording songs, music, and stories. This conversation is excerpted from a longer interview that focused on Aidan’s years in Newfoundland, work as a broadcaster in Newfoundland, and relationship to the Cape Shore.

A first visit to the Cape Shore / Aidan O'Hara

Aidan O’Hara describes his first visit to the Cape Shore, meeting John Keefe in Placentia, and the way that Ireland was remembered by the people whom he encountered. This conversation is excerpted from a longer interview that focused on Aidan’s years in Newfoundland, work as a broadcaster in Newfoundland, and relationship with the people of the Cape Shore.

A house party in Branch, The Forgotten Irish / Aidan O'Hara

The opening sequence from The Forgotten Irish documentary depicting a “time” in the Roche household. This clip features set dancing and accordion playing. The Forgotten Irish television documentary first broadcast on 17 March 1981 in celebration of the Irish living overseas on St Patrick’s Day. The Radharc documentary film series includes over 400 films dealing with issues of human rights, injustice, faith, religion, persecution, struggles against oppressive regimes, famine, and Christian heritage.  With thanks to RTÉ Archives for granting permission to exhibit this clip from The Forgotten Irish. To view the entire documentary, visit https://www.rte.ie/archives/ex...

Step dancing in Branch, The Forgotten Irish / Aidan O'Hara

Gerald Campbell plays singles on harmonica while John Hennessy step dances in Dermot Roche’s kitchen. This sequence featured in The Forgotten Irish documentary. The Forgotten Irish television documentary first broadcast on 17 March 1981 in celebration of the Irish living overseas on St Patrick’s Day. The Radharc documentary film series includes over 400 films dealing with issues of human rights, injustice, faith, religion, persecution, struggles against oppressive regimes, famine, and Christian heritage.  With thanks to RTÉ Archives for granting permission to exhibit this clip from The Forgotten Irish. To view the entire documentary, visit https://www.rte.ie/archives/ex...

Henry Power dancing / Aidan O'Hara

Henry Power dancing / Aidan O'Hara

Henry Power (son of Anthony and Mary Power) dancing "a few scuffs" in the Roche household. The Roche family and friends look on (left to right): Keith Roche, Paula Manore (née Roche), Mary Jean Lyth (née Roche), Dermot Roche, Petchie Nash, Jerry Power (Henry's brother). Three girls sit in the background of the photo (left to right): Karen Sarro (née Roche), Michelle d'Entremont, Audrey Wilson (née Roche).

Set dance in Branch / Aidan O'Hara

Set dance in Branch / Aidan O'Hara

Two children watch a dance in the Roche household in Branch. Left to right: Paula Manore (née Roche), Mary Jean Lyth (née Roche, daughters of Dermot Roche), unidentified woman, Lucy Nash (née Connors).

A visit with Caroline Brennan / Aidan O'Hara

A visit with Caroline Brennan / Aidan O'Hara

Caroline Brennan and her family standing outside her house in Ship Cove with visitors. Left to right: Joyce O'Hara, Caroline Brennan, Lucy Nash (née Connors), Virginia Ryan (née Preston). 

Gerald Campbell playing the accordion / Aidan O'Hara

Gerald Campbell playing the accordion / Aidan O'Hara

Gerald Campbell playing the accordion in the Roche's house.

The O'Hara and Roche families in Branch, October 1975 / Aidan O'Hara

The O'Hara and Roche families in Branch, October 1975 / Aidan O'Hara

A portrait of members of the Roche and O'Hara families in Branch. From left to right: Paula (Roche) Manore ; Hannah ('Hannie') Dunphy (Dermot Roche's step aunt) ; Rover (dog) ; Karen (Roche) Sarro ; Vince Roche ; Raphael Roche ; Brian Ó hEadhra ; Dermot Roche ; Joyce O'Hara ; Rita Roche ; Conor O'Hara. The green Ford Comet at the front of the photo is the car that Aidan O'Hara used for his trips to the Cape Shore.