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Johnny Me Darling Lad

Johnny me darling lad, song / Mary Wall, singing in English

Johnny me darling lad, song / Mary Wall, singing in English

‘Oh when will we get married, oh Johnny my darling lad?’
‘We’ll get married tomorrow, if that will suit you well.’
‘Couldn’t we be married sooner, Johnny my darling lad?’
'Do you want to be married this minute? Oh woman, I think you’re mad!’

‘And who will we have at the wedding, oh Johnny my darling lad?’
‘We’ll have our fathers and mothers, if that will suit you well.’
‘Couldn’t we have anyone better, Johnny my darling lad?’
‘Do you want to have the whole congregation? Oh woman, I think you’re mad!’

‘And what’ll we have for the wedding, oh Johnny my darling lad?’
‘We’ll have praties and cabbage for the wedding, if that will suit you well.’
‘Couldn’t we have anything better, Johnny my darling lad?’
‘Do you want to have cabbage and bacon? Oh woman, I think you’re mad!’

‘And what’ll we have for the bed, oh Johnny my darling lad?’
‘A sopeen of straw in the corner, if that will suit you well.’
‘Couldn’t we have anything better, Johnny my darling lad?’
‘Do you want to be rolling in feathers? Oh woman, I think you’re mad!’

‘And when’ll we have the babies, oh Johnny my darling lad?’
‘When God will please to send them, if that will suit you well.’
‘Couldn’t we have them any sooner, Johnny my darling lad?’
‘Do you want to have’m this minute? Oh woman, I think you’re mad!'

Notes from Hugh Shields

In Verse 4ii a sopeen refers to a “small wisp.“ The song is of English origin (see M Dean-Smith’s A guide to English folk-song collections, 1822–1952 [nd:116]). “When shall we get married?” Shields Index no 226.