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The Dark-Eyed Gipsy

The dark-eyed gipsy, song / Dennis Healey, singing in English

The dark-eyed gipsy, song / Dennis Healey, singing in English

There was three gipsies lived in the East
They sang so sweet and bonny oh
They sang so sweet, so very sweet
They charmed the heart of the lady oh

When Charles he came home late at night
Enquiring for his lady oh
‘She’s gone, she’s gone,' said his own waiting-man
‘She has followed the dark-eyed gipsy oh.’

[‘Then saddle me my milk-white steed -
The brown one’s not so speedy oh -
That I may ride the whole length of the night
Till I find out the dark-eyed gipsy oh.’]

Then he rode North and he rode South
He rode East and Westwards oh
Until he met with his own wedded wife
And she following the dark-eyed gipsy oh

‘Will you forsake your house and land?
Will you forsake your children oh?
Will you forsake your own wedded lord
And follow the dark-eyed gipsy oh?’

‘What do I care for house and land?
What do I care for my children oh?
What do I care for my own wedded lord
When I followed the dark-eyed gipsy oh!’

She took the garment that she wore
She bound it as a head-dress oh
Saying ‘I’ll eat the grass, I’ll drink the dew
And follow the dark-eyed gipsy oh.’

Db Item 119 Musictr
Db Item 119 Musictr

© 

Notes from Hugh Shields

The ballad “The gipsy laddie” (see Child, The English and Scottish popular ballads, 1882–98 [vol 4, 1965:61–74]). Cf. the rendition published in Ceol I 4 (1964:6–7). Charmed is pronounced ‘char-um’d’; Charles is pronounced with two syllables. Shields Index 108.