Don’t come again, song

Eddie and Gracie Butcher, singing in English
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Lyrics

Oh, the first place that I saw my love it was at a ball,
I looked on her, I gazed on her, oh, far above them all;
But aye she lookéd on me with scorn and disdain
And the bonnie wee lasses [E] / lassie’s [G]  answer was to no come again,
Was to no come again,
And the bonnie wee lasses [E] / lassie’s [G]  answer was to no come again.

2
The next place that I saw my love it was at a wake,
I looked on her, I gazed on her, I thought my heart would break;
But aye she looked on me with scorn and disdain
and the bonny wee lass’s/lassie’s answer was to no come again, &c.

3
It being in six months after, a little or above,
When Cupid shot his arrow and he wounded my true love;
He wounded her severely; it caused her to complain
And she wrote to him a letter saying, – You might come again, &c.

4
I wrote her back an answer all for to let her know
While life was in my body it’s there I wouldnae go,
While life was in my body and while it does remain
I will aye mind the girl that said – Don’t come again, &c.

5
Come all you pretty fair maids, a warning take by me,
Never slight a young man wherever they may be,
For if you do you’re sure to rue, they’ll cause you to complain
And you’ll aye rue [E] / mind [G] the day that you said, – Don’t come again,
You said –  Don’t come again,
You will aye rue the day you said – Don’t come again.

Notes

Eddie sang the complete text in 1955 and recorded it twenty years later, though somewhat uncertain of the words in 1966. At that time, it became clear that this wife Gracie also knew the song – which derives from the singing of one of her aunts – and in 1975 she was induced to sing it in duet with Eddie. Their few individual variants are shown followed by their initials. The song came from English broadsides and was printed on at least one Irish sheet, but I have found no other Irish oral version. The Appalachian versions are textually diverse and introduce older lyric commonplaces. Ata the same time, like Eddie’s and Gracie’s, they shorten the broadside text omitting hints that the girl’s change of heart is motivated by pregnancy.